The Kids and Movies

We brought the 2 kids to 2 animations recently, 1 in June and another yesterday. Knowing the personalities of the kids (and mine) well, the Man graciously arranged for Matthew to be seated beside me while he seated Megan next to him. This arrangement worked very well, for both Matthew and I could sit through the entire movie without speaking a word, and with manageable fidgeting. I was still able to discern the differences in the 2 movies, and the kids as well.

Monsters University

Monsters University

Image taken from http://pixartimes.com

The morals of the story behind this movie, to me, were 2 – teamwork, and knowing and playing to one’s strength. While adults might have accumulated enough life experiences to relate easily to these 2 learning points from the movie, I wasn’t so sure that 6 year-olds could relate that easily, let alone 4 year-olds.

And I was right, about my kids at least.  6yo Matthew had lost interest in the popcorn very early into the movie, and sat quietly through almost the whole movie, eyes riveted to the screen most of the time. He only fidgeted big time three-quarters into the movie when he turned towards me and asked if the show was ending soon, while presenting me with a large yawn. I also realised that Matthew had an unconventional sense of humour, for he laughed at parts of the movie where the audience was quiet. Only he seemed to find the parts amusing, which wasn’t necessarily a bad thing. I think.

4yo Megan was able to sustain her interest for about half the movie because she was stuffing popcorn into her mouth while she watched the screen. After the Man stopped her feasting, she fidgeted much and clutched tightly to the Man because she didn’t like the monsters and kept telling the Man she was “scared of the monsters”.

After the show however, the kids enthused about which monsters they liked best. And true to their personalities, the nerdier Matthew loved Mikey because he had the brains and was the true leader in the partnership. Megan liked the “2-eye monster” maybe because Sulley was athletic. Though I think the real reason she liked Sulley was because he looked cuddly and huggable, and had purple spots (her favourite colour) all over his body. Matthew liked the movie more than he let on, through his drawings of the monsters in school, for about 3 days in a row after the movie.

Monsters Inc. had a simpler theme (rescuing a little girl and thinking out of the box) than Monsters University for young kids in my opinion. Monsters University would be good for tweens and above.

Despicable Me 2

Despicable Me 2

Image taken from http://definitelyentertaining.com

This was a movie not for young kids. Catching villians and blossoming love between a man and a woman were quite remote in young kids’ lives to strike any chord.

Matthew was yawning and fidgeting a lot more during this movie compared to Monsters University. He did laugh out loud and often (along with everyone else) at the antics of the adorable minions, the souls of the entire movie. He was much easier to handle. There was very little for me to do, except to keep bringing his elbows down from behind his head, to avoid blocking the person sitting behind him.

Megan, on the other hand, hated the loud noises throughout the movie; the weapons shooting, cars chasing, and villiany noises all assulted her sensitive senses. She made the Man cover her ears most of the time, and ended up in his embrace halfway through the movie. She buried her body, koala-style, onto the Man’s and covered her face with the hood of her sweater. Not having anything to munch this time round didn’t help matters.

Though Despicable Me 2 was sweet and the minions so adorable, it paled in comparison to Monsters University in terms of depth of the story. Nevertheless both were enjoyable outings with the kids. Thanks to the Man who kept restless and talkative Megan away, and left quiet Matthew with his quiet mummy.

Next up, Turbo maybe?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s